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  1. 3 points
    Moin. Premieres allow you to present pre-produced content as if it was live if you're on Twitch or YouTube. This has various benefits: Your viewers get notified beforehand when new content will appear and can count down until the video goes live There will be a chat when watching a video, giving opportunities for live interaction on a channel that doesn't live stream Because there is chat, chat-specific revenue streams (bits/super chat/...) can be harvested that otherwise would not be an option for non-live channels. This all sounds exciting, but to use premieres as effectively as possible, be aware of the following things: Firstly, it takes a while until videos are properly processed. This means that you should have finished the upload a good while before you have the premiere go live, else your viewers may see only a poor quality version (360p) of the video. Secondly, it's possible to hurt your channel performance with premieres. Let me elaborate: A premiere is designed to be annoying and teasing. Teasing, because your viewers get told about a video before it goes live. This is expected for things like movies (hence the teaser trailers), but for regular videos, people aren't used to it whatsoever. Annoying, because it wants your viewers to watch the premiere on a specific time, so the reminders for it are a bit more aggressive than usual. This together means that premieres can be just as frustrating as they can be exciting. And this often shows; premieres tend to get a ton of dislikes even before they go live just because people want to watch your video, but can't yet. Further, a non-fan subscriber, ie a person who subscribed to you but only occasionally watches your videos, may be okay with your videos showing up in their subscription feed, but not with premiere notifications on their phone. So if you upload daily content and premiere it all, non-fans may unsubscribe simply because this constant stream of annoying notifications is driving them nuts. So, before you go and premiere every single video, consider whether it's worth getting hyped up about: Regular, daily content probably doesn't need premieres, just as daily TV episodes don't get teaser trailers. If you have a fixed upload schedule, people already can plan around your content. Season beginnings probably can benefit from premieres, again, just like TV seasons. Especially if you haven't done the format in some time. Fortnightly or monthly content probably always can be premiered as people probably won't remember an upload schedule like this. Irregular content, eg. specials or the occasional short film on a channel that otherwise does vlogs, probably always can benefit from premieres. On twitch, of course, none of this matters because you don't have a choice anymore. Thirdly, premiere times matter. This is true for both when the premiere is taking place and for how long you announce it. As for the taking place, a premiere effectively is a live stream, so you want it to go live at a time when most of your audience can watch it. Your real time analytics should give you a picture on roughly how views get distributed over the day, but note that there are differences due to weekends, holidays, other premieres (both online, on TV and on cinemas). As for the announce times, there doesn't appear to be a standard yet. Some creators announce their premieres earlier that day, some announce it days in advance. Both have benefits and drawbacks: A short announcement may cause viewers to go "alright, just gonna do laundry and then watch this premiere", but people only logging in once per day may completely miss it. A long announcement makes sure that everyone checking in daily has seen it, but by the time the premiere is actually starting, they may already have forgotten that it happened. Fourthly, you matter. The primary benefit the viewers get out of a premiere is that they can chat in real time with you, the creator, and with each other. Especially for larger channels, this can bring back a sense of community that otherwise would be lost among the void that is the comment section. Further, it allows viewers to say "thank you" with a super chat. The primary benefit for the creator is that you can see exactly what people are reacting to in real time, instead of seeing a "like" or "dislike" at the end of all it. Further, you can say "thank you" to any super chats rolling in. But all of this sort of breaks down if you aren't there when the premiere is happening, so: Be there. Lastly, premieres don't get watched as much as you think they should be. Even with all this extra promotion that goes into premieres, the numbers for people that actually are as it's going on tends to be way lower than you expect it to be. If 10% of your subscribers usually watch a video of yours within the first hour, prepare for 1% of your subscribers to be there during the premiere.
  2. 3 points
    Cearly, YouTube couldn't care less on its content creators. Either have I read the case of this guy whose video has been copied and uploaded by others and is punished -even YT could easily identify who did upload the original video or at least who did it first-... or those of us who keep to be not monetized with ambiguous responses instead of actually flagging those videos in our channels who do not comply so we can actually LEARN from the procces instead of being kept in the darkness...
  3. 2 points
    Moin. This article is to explain some common reasons behind the messages that YouTube gives you when rejecting your monetization application. See also: A list of YouTube policies and guidelines Note: posting why you got rejected in this thread will only serve as examples for other people as to what gets rejected, I won't be able to help you restore monetization. How to find the reason? You can find a general reason by going to your monetization page. Details on each reason can be found below. Reused content (or Duplication) If your channel is disabled for monetization because of duplication, it means that some of your content is identical with some other content on YouTube. This happens for example if you upload public domain footage royalty-free music videos other people made (reuploads) compilations anything that got claimed by ContentID reading outs of stories posted on other websites recordings of live concerts, DVDs, TV shows, and other copyright infringing activity unedited, uncommentated gameplay videos* While you may have the necessary rights to upload the video, AdSense has an "imperative of originality", making channels largely based around duplicate content ineligible for monetization. For more examples see the Content Quality Guidelines. To clarify, using third party footage in videos is still allowed for monetization (if all the licenses are in place), however, having a channel that has a focus on the third party footage (eg a music promotion channel or a compilation channel) is not. * "Videos simply showing a user playing a video game or the use of software for extended periods of time may not be accepted for monetization." says https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/138161?hl=en. So this content getting rejected from monetization is expected, the category it is listed in may be unexpected though. How to fix this? In order to get your channel eligible for monetization again, you need to remove all duplicate content. If all your content is duplicate content, you may want to look at alternative monetization models such as Patreon or merchandise instead as deleting all your videos probably isn't going to be worth it (especially considering that you'd drop to 0 watch hours again without any videos). For uncommentated gameplay content, you may want to do other kinds of gameplay videos, for example heavily edited videos, machinimas, reviews or commentated walkthroughs. You can reapply after 30 days. Impersonation ? If your channel is disabled for monetization because of impersonation, it means that your channel is confusingly similar to another channel, so for example: same avatar same name same channel banner same thumbnails same videos same video titles How to fix this? Change the points mentioned above to something different. You can reapply after 30 days. View count spam ? If your channel is disabled for monetization because of view count spam, it means that you have been using means to illegitimately obtain views. For example: View bots Purchasing views from websites promising "real views" Having your own videos running for extended periods of time in the background Participating in exchanges (sub4sub, view4view) Incentivizing people to watch your videos How to fix this? Stop using the above methods to get views. You can reapply after 30 days. Video spam ? If your channel is disabled for monetization because of video spam, it means that you have uploaded many overly similar videos, for example: "Learn how to count with soccer balls", "Learn how to count with elephants", "... with tires", lipsticks, bees, soda bottles, trains, and so on. In other words, if a viewer could accurately predict how most of your videos will look like after just watching one or two of them, you likely are going to get not approved. It may also mean that you have uploaded other content that typically is classified as spam, ie large amounts of untargeted, repetitive and otherwise unwanted videos. How to fix this? Instead of uploading videos that are mostly based around the same idea and iterate through details, make unique videos. Misleading Thumbnails ? If your channel is disabled for monetization because of misleading thumbnails, it means that your thumbnails did not represent the contents of your video. How to fix this? Your thumbnail should represent what your video is about. So the easiest way to not go wrong on this is to screenshot a specific frame of your video and use that as thumbnail. You may want to take at the Creator Academy lesson on making good thumbnails: https://creatoracademy.youtube.com/page/lesson/thumbnails You can reapply after 30 days. Other Reasons ? There may be other reasons that I'm not aware of at the time of writing. If you got rejected for a different reason (as in: something that is neither duplicate content, impersonation, view count spam, video spam nor misleading thumbnails), please let me know in the comments! The below happens only if you already have been monetizing already and now monetization disabled Repeated submission of ineligible videos and/or insufficient documentation ? If your channel is disabled for monetization because of repeated submission of ineligible videos and/or insufficient documentation, it means that Videos you submitted for monetization got claimed by a right holder When asked for documentation of commercial use rights, you didn't send sufficient documentation proving you have said rights Videos you submitted for monetization repeatedly were confirmed to be not advertiser-friendly by reviewers How to fix this? There is no fix. You have shown to YouTube repeatedly that you aren't a reliable business partner, and they no longer want to conduct business with you. Invalid Click Activity ? AdSense has a quite extensive help article on this topic themselves: https://support.google.com/adsense/answer/57153?hl=en TL;DR: Invalid click activity happens if people click on your ads with the intention to generate money for you, rather than because they're interested in the ads. It's up to you as an AdSense partner to report any suspicious activity to AdSense, and to try to not direct any bad traffic (like view-/clickbots) to your channel. How to fix this? If you get your monetization disabled for invalid click activity initially, you'll have to wait for 30 days for your AdSense account to come back – sometimes. In other times or severe cases your AdSense account will be disabled permanently. You can appeal (see the help page linked above), but you'll have to come with a good explanation on why the click activity was valid (eg: "this video suddenly got viral in a certain country and got featured all over the news" if that's why your video got a lot of views in a short time). An appeal that is saying basically "I didn't do anything" is unlikely to help you (because you not monitoring your traffic is the very issue here). As a final note, if this happens to you while you're partnered with an MCN, you'll have to work with them to get your AdSense account reinstated.
  4. 2 points
    Moin. Making a review is easy: Sit down, talk about a product and upload it. Making a good review however is a lot more difficult, so here are some necessary things, optimizations and things to avoid you should keep in mind. (This post assumes that you've already read part 1: Becoming a YouTuber: The Basics and defined your audience and figured out from which angle you'll tackle your reviews) Necessary things Be subjective. Being subjective is the point of a review, it's about your subjective experience you've had with the product, whether you like it and whether you think it's worth its money, in short: it's your opinion on the quality of a product. Being subjective doesn't mean being arbitrary, you will have to explain how you came to your conclusion. You'll probably have to use some facts as a foundation for you opinion, but don't just dump facts into the videos under the guise that it's going to make your video more objective. Again, objectiveness isn't the point. Be transparent on how you got your product, ie whether you bought it yourself or got a free sample. Never review a product that is sponsoring your video. As a reviewer or critic, you have some journalistic duties and ethics to consider and perhaps even legal ones. Have your own opinion. While it's not forbidden to read other reviews before doing yours, it certainly is not really useful because you'll be watering down your opinion with other's opinions. Further, it can happen that you accidentally plagiarize, which most definitely is a death sentence in any sort of journalistic outlet. Be fair and true and back up opinions with arguments, and arguments with facts. If you are praising or hating on products but can't really back it up with arguments, you'll quickly lose any reputation as a reviewer and at best will be good for entertainment. If what you're saying isn't true, the same happens, plus you will get into legal trouble sooner or later. Have a conclusion. Typically, this includes some sort of rating system. It doesn't necessarily have to be a star system or out-of-10 thing, I actually wouldn't even recommend them due to their rather arbitrary nature, but a simple "recommend/don't recommend" and maybe an additional "only recommend if you like the genre" and "only recommend if the price drops" Optimizations Keep your review concise. Not necessarily short, but always to the point. Structure your review. This doesn't necessarily mean that you'll need to have distinct sections in your video, but finding out how to group what you're going to say is a good idea. If you don't do this, you'll risk having arrived at your conclusion, only to quickly throw in a short "btw, I found character X terrible" at the very end, which doesn't really fit there and would've been better when you were discussing why you didn't get attached to any character or whatever. Having a script helps with the two aforementioned points tremendously. In fact, having a script is almost mandatory because else it's rather difficult to get the opinions you have in your head into any form of linear media (which includes video). Show, don't (just) tell. If you're criticizing a thing that actually is visible, try cutting to some footage of the thing you're talking about while you're talking about it. Beware of copyright on creative works. Showing as little of the copyrighted work as necessary usually prevents overactive filters from troubling you too much. Include nit-picking. What is a minor annoyance for you may be a dealbreaker for someone else. That said, if you think that the entire product is garbage anyways, there's little use to include every single nit-pick because you'll already have a lot of major negative points anyways. Reviews are at the intersection of hub and help content. Meaning that you both can appeal to people who already watch your content and new people who come via search. To optimize for newcomers, make sure you don't have too much information that only are useful for fans in your reviews, especially not right at the beginning. Also, SEO matters here a lot. To optimize for long-term viewers, try making your videos more entertaining, rather than simply a utility that helps people form an opinion. Be on time. It generally doesn't make as much sense to review a product that's been out on the market for a long time and is due to be replaced by its successor in 3 months or so anyways. that said, there is a niche for "retro reviews". Things to avoid Avoid summarizing the content of creative works. Not only will spoil this the experience for anyone still wanting to watch the thing, a summary of the content also isn't really helpful for the viewer as the summary says very little about consistency, cinematography, pacing, gameplay, wording, acting, etc., ie the actual qualities that allow you to distinguish between bad and good creative works. Instead, comparing the work to other works ("it's a bit like film X") or even genres ("it's a fast-paced horror game") may be more useful. Reviews are not summaries. That said, including the premise of the work typically is a good idea. Warning people before a spoiler comes also is a good thing that people generally will thank you for. Avoid large fact dumps. This is especially true for technical products, you generally don't need to read out the entire product technical sheet in order to have someone follow how you came to your conclusion. Reviews are not readouts of advertisement texts and other stuff the product may ship with. Adding your own facts (benchmarks, somewhat standardized tests) however is generally good. Avoid relying on first impressions. Reviews are not unboxings. You should be at least using the product for a couple days, or better: weeks before forming the opinion you'll include in your video. Once you have made some reviews, it's time for part 3: optimizing the channel
  5. 2 points
    Moin. It's time for this year's installment of the forever-burning question new creators have: "How do I get more subscribers on YouTube?" It'll start by covering the channel setup, followed by some guidelines on optimizing videos. After that come more advanced optimizations for both channel and individual videos, and lastly, strangely enough, the prerequisite for this all: Making good videos. This article serves as an addition to the fundamentals outlined here: Part one: The Channel Setup This part is about setting up the channel from scratch. It assumes that you don't have videos yet, but that you do have a clear vision of what you'd like your channel to be. 1.1: The Channel Name (Difficulty: Surprisingly hard, Impact: Medium) The channel name is one of the first things someone will see of your content. It's how people can find you later in case you impress them with the first video they watch so much that they want to see more of you. Goal: The channel name should match what you're doing to some extend without locking you in. It should be a name you can be proud of, one that you wouldn't be ashamed to tell your parents about, one that is memorable and one that isn't overly generic or has pre-existing meaning. Examples to avoid: CSGO gamer 42: This makes it difficult to justify making videos about anything other than CS:GO, it locks you in to just one type of game. More broadly, "gamer" does the same. Cool videos: This makes it very difficult to search for your channel as there are a lot of "cool videos" out there. xXbrsgnlXx: While it's possible here to find just your videos when searching for them, it also is kinda difficult to remember what one actually should search for. Tip: You can change your channel name at any time, but if you do it, all your viewers will have to re-learn your name which not all will do. The earlier you're set on a channel name, the better. 1.2: The About page (Difficulty: Easy, Impact: Small) The about page dictates the snippet that's shown when someone searches for your channel, which links show up on your channel page and establish contact information. Goal: Have an about page that... tells new people finding your channel what your channel is about tells viewers when to expect new videos ("upload schedule") has an "for business enquiries" email address has links to relevant social media accounts Tip: Have a dedicated business email address that isn't attached to your Google account in any way. This way, it becomes more difficult for a hacker to guess the password of your account, because they don't know which account to hack to get access to your channel. 1.3: The Branding (Difficult: Medium, Impact: Medium) The branding is the combination of your channel name, channel logo, channel art, channel trailer, about page, your video thumbnails, intros and outros, watermarks, graphics you have in your videos and so on. You'll notice that the name and about page are the two steps previous to this - that's because you'll need your channel description and name anyways to determine what the branding should look like. As YouTube puts it: -- https://creatoracademy.youtube.com/page/lesson/brand-identity?cid=bootcamp-foundations Goal: Make a consistent brand across your channel Tips: You can hire a graphical artist for this. You can try doing the branding yourself, especially if you're choosing to mainly go through typography. Don't expect good fonts and artists to be free. Artists and type designers want to get paid for their work just like you (probably) very much would get like to get paid for your videos later on. Part two: Video Optimization This part focuses on things you can optimize for on a per-video-basis. 2.1: Thumbnails (Difficulty: Medium, Impact: High) The thumbnail makes and breaks the success of a video. A boring thumbnail won't get clicked on, while a good one can make you click on content even if you don't know what the video is about ("clickbait"). Goals: Make clickable thumbnails that add to the title of the video and represent your video. Take thumbnails seriously Tips: There's so many of them that we have its own article on it, with the article linking to yet more articles! 2.2: Titles (Difficulty: Medium, Impact: High) Titles are the other half of the thumbnail when it comes to getting people to click on your videos. It always displays right next to it, so you don't need to repeat the information given in the title in the thumbnail and vice versa. Unlike thumbnails, titles also fulfill an search engine optimization (SEO) role: Search engines can read text, but have difficulties reading thumbnails. And titles are text. Goals: Have a title that accurately describes the topic of your video Have it do so in an SEO-friendly manner. Take titles seriously Tips: Keep the most important information first, branding and part number can come later YouTube has some tips on the topic (plus some more about thumbnails) You don't need to optimize titles for search if you don't want to get found through search. This can be a valid strategy for some Hub content. (What's that?) Examples: “Chocolate Ice Cream” is nice, but “How To Make Chocolate Ice Cream with Low Sugar” would be better as it contains more keywords that are very relevant for the video. "[SomeChannel] Let's Play The Game That Isn't Tetris: Extreme Edition Part 4: THE BLOCKS ARE MELTING" is bad, "THE BLOCKS ARE MELTING! #4 Let's Play The Game That isn't Tetris: Extreme Edition | SomeChannel" would be better because in the first example, the text would cut off after "Extreme", taking away vital information (part number and the actual title). Potentially better still would just be "THE BLOCKS ARE MELTING!" if this isn't content that requires people to watch the previous episode to get the current one. (see also: Why making a good Let's Play is hard - and being successful with it near impossible) 2.3: The first 15 seconds (Difficulty: Easy, Impact: Medium) Once you've got a viewer to click on your video, you'll need to keep them watching. A viewer who isn't hooked in by the first couple seconds may thing "meh, boring", and simply click the "back" button to watch a different video. This is especially true for tutorials and similar content where there typically is multiple tutorials about a single thing. Goal: Cut away as much fluff as possible from the beginning. Tips: Avoid using intros (aka title cards) or sponsor messages at the very beginning - people coming in may just have watched 2 ads just to get to your video (see also: Why intros are unnecessary) If you have to have intros or sponsor messages near the beginning, put a hook (aka cold open) before them. A hook is an exciting part of the video that also appears later in video (often the part just before the climax) 2.4: Description (Difficulty: Medium, Impact: Medium) A video's description is built out of 2 parts: 3 lines of "Above the fold" section, and a "below the fold" section. It's mostly the "above the fold" section that's going to be shown in search results or next to videos. Goals: Have an "above the fold" section that adds to title and thumbnail, especially for people coming from search. Have a "below the fold" section that features further information on your video, links to relevant pages and info on your channel. Tips: You can use the below the fold section for all sorts of SEO purposes. Any keywords that you haven't mentioned yet in the title go here. But do craft an actual description here, search engines will simply ignore it if you just put a list of keywords in it. You can put a sponsor link into the above the fold section if you want more people to click it. Very few people actually read the description. If you want people to know something about the video you didn't mention in the video itself, have a pinned comment. YouTube has some tips on the topic. 2.5: Hashtags (Difficulty: Easy, Impact: Low) If you write a #hashtag in the description, it can be clicked on and searched for. YouTube displays up to 3 hashtags above the title. Goal: Put the most important keywords that aren't yet part of the title as hashtags in your description. Tips: 2.6: Tags (Difficulty: As hard as you make it for you, Impact: Very low) Tags used to have loads of strategies for them, but turned rather irrelevant in the past couple years. What we do know about them: The first few tags have additional weight Tags are only used for a while until YouTube figures out based on viewer interaction on who is or isn't going to like your video and does recommendations based on that. Goal: Put the most important keywords you had in title and description in your tags. Tip: Don't spend too much time on this. Maybe a minute or two while you wait for YouTube to finish processing your video. Part three: Channel and video optimization This part assumes that you already have a couple of videos. 3.1: Calls to action (Difficulty: Easy, Impact: High) A call to action is you telling your viewers a thing to do. "Subscribe to my channel", "watch this video next", "press like if you liked it", "support me on patreon" etc. Goal: Incorporate CTAs into your videos. Tips: 3.2: Cross-referencing content (Difficulty: Easy, Impact: Low) After having made a couple of videos, chances are that a new topic you want to tackle happens to contain very similar information to something you made earlier. For example, if you're explaining how flowers reproduce and you already made a video how bees eat. In this case, instead of repeating the information again, you can point to this other video and continue without the repetition. Goal: Identify other videos of yours that are particularly relevant to what you're doing at any part of a video and link to them using Cards. Tip: issue a call to action and physically point to where the card will appear if you want everyone to notice them. Note: Linking to other channels or to external websites will reduce the watch time on your video. 3.3: Endscreens (Difficulty: Medium, Impact: Medium) Just like cards, endscreens can be used for cross-referencing content of yours. The difference here is that a) endscreens can only be placed in the last 20s of the video, b) endscreens cannot be hidden and c) you want your viewers to click on end cards as much as possible, as they can only extend the watch time your channel receives. Endscreens are part of your branding. Goal: Use endscreens to guide users to watching more videos of yours, subscribing or supporting you otherwise. Tips: As said in aforementioned "Like comment and subscribe" - the worst way to end a video, don't overwhelm the viewer with things they can do. You have 20s to do it, you can space your CTAs quite a lot. Avoid covering still ongoing content with endscreens Focus on keeping people watching, either by having them watch more videos now (by suggesting a relevant video), or later (by asking them to subscribe) Always pair the endscreens with CTAs Be clear on what you ask. This isn't the place for subtleties. 3.4: Building Watchtime (Difficulty: Hard, Impact: Very High) Watch time is the most important metric on YouTube by far. You can have done any of the above, but if people don't actually watch your video, you won't be getting anywhere. Note that watch time is only the metric you have access to; YouTube actually likes session watch time more - ie how long you keep people on the platform. This means that, all other things being equal, YouTube would prefer a video linking to another video in the end screen more than a video linking somewhere off-site. Goal: Keep people wanting to watch more of your videos. This is a difficult and rather intangible goal to reach. I can give some tips on this, but you really are put to the test here to really know what your audience wants and how to satisfy them. Tips: Make as much good content as possible. Or in other words Make longer videos... Without adding any fluff, off-topic discussions or ramblings. While coming to the point as quickly as possible. Without reducing quality or upload frequency Livestreams drive a lot of watch time... But livestreams usually lose a lot of their value once they're done, so their recordings can be worthless and bury the rest of your content but YouTube isn't a live streaming platform, so a lot of viewers aren't willing to watch live streams on it but streams often are difficult to incorporate into a normal content schedule but it makes it more difficult to be relevant anywhere else on the globe other than your own time zone Make more videos without reducing their quality or length without overwhelming your viewers without burning yourself out Make higher-quality videos using e.g. B-roll, more camera angles and other film techniques without reducing the upload frequency or length without burning yourself out At the end of the day, "how to get more watch time" is as complicated as "how to get more subscribers". There is no clear guideline on how to get it, there's only "make as much good content as possible" with some compromises you can take. 3.5: Channel trailer (Difficulty: Medium, Impact: Low-Medium) Just like the about page, the channel trailer should tell the viewer something about your channel and in particular why they should subscribe to you. Goal: Make a trailer that explains what you do, when you upload (your schedule), gives examples of your videos, and a call-to-action to subscribe. In other words, make an audiovisual resumé of your channel. Tips: Just like a resumé, the channel trailer can change over time. You should update it probably once a year or so, because who you are and what skills you have now probably is quite different to what you had 3 years ago. Keep it short, below 2 minutes or so. You can let your work speak for yourself and just present your best video to date as your channel trailer. But, again, just like with a resumé, it's not that common to get hired simply because someone heard you did a stellar job somewhere else. 3.6: Playlists (Difficulty: Easy, Impact: Medium) Playlists let you group videos together. This is useful if people want to binge-watch your content. Goal: Make a playlist for every series/format you have going on. Tips: Put videos into their respective playlists as soon as you upload them. Doing it later only makes things more frustrating for both you, who eventually has to shift through dozens of videos at once, and the viewers, who want to binge-watch your content, but can't because you haven't set up or kept up-to-date your playlists. You can make playlists based on keywords, too. For example, if you have a car repair series, having a general car repair playlist as well as a Mercedes repair playlist may be useful. If you can't upload for a while, share some "best of"-playlists with your subscribers and followers on social media. For each playlist, put in a playlist description. 3.7: Collaborations (Difficulty: Hard, Impact: High) Making a video or a set of videos together with someone else is always beneficial for everyone involved. If two channels with 100 subscribers collaborate, both can end up with 200 subscribers after the collaboration, because the subscribers on one channel may not have known about the other channel. Goal: Find a channel similar to yours to collaborate with. Tips: While homogenous collaborations are more common (eg two tech channels working together), collaborating with someone in a different genre can lead to good results as well (eg. a game dev and an artist). Collaborating with channels smaller than yours is surprisingly effective; small channels tend to have a much more loyal and tight-knit community. Collaborations should at least consist of 2 videos, one to be uploaded on your channel with your branding, one on theirs with their branding. Just making one video and uploading it to both channels will have the videos cannibalize each other in terms of watch time. 3.8: Community tab and Stories (Difficulty: Easy, Impact: Medium) Stories are short, unedited videos and photos you can maybe slap a sticker on you can make in the YouTube-app. They can be used to show fans a behind-the-scenes of your production without annoying non-fans with fluff content they don't care about. The community tab is a feed where you can post text, photos and polls for your fans and eg. update them on the status of an upcoming videos, or ask them for feedback for new topics. Both of them are great for turning subscribers into fans and getting fans to support you through patreon or merch, however, both currently only are really visible on mobile. Further, there are subscriber limitations on both of them, so you may not be able to use them yet. Goal: Use the community tab and stories in order to remind your subscribers that you are a human being and not some sort of übermensch that through magic produces one good video after another. Or as the cool kids would say: "Use it to make yourself more #relatable". Tips: None yet. Do you have some? Share them below! Part four: The prerequisite All of the above requires you to roughly know and to be able to make good videos. A good video can be many things: Insightful, thrilling, inspirational, educational, artistic, technically impressive, entertaining and so on, in each case it's not boring, monotonous or hard to watch. However, I've seen more people than I'd like crank out video after video over months or even years, with all of them being either boring, monotonous or generally hard to watch. Some of them had shown that they care about their channel overall, they had quite a good branding, metadata and so on, but despite all that, they weren't close to making good videos and the videos also weren't improving over time other than maybe some gear upgrades at some point. I don't want you to be these people. So please: Evaluate your videos critically. You usually can see issues others cannot see because you had the vision of the video in your head for so long that you know where the shortcomings are. Spend some time on thinking about those, and on how to improve them. Challenge yourself with your videos. Go out of your comfort zone with your video and make something that's more difficult to do every now and again. For example, if you talk but have to cut every other sentence because you misspoke or forgot what you tried to say, make a couple livestreams where you can't do that. The livestreams probably will be rather unenjoyable, but if you then go back to your regular videos, you'll probably be a better talker that maybe can get paragraphs out at a time, making the any cuts an artistic choice rather than a necessity. Evaluate how much you are enjoying making videos critically every now and again. It's easy to fall into a "I'm grinding away now, I'll become easier later if I'm just persistent enough" mindset. But grinding is worthless if you aren't either enjoying it or at least learning from it. Fact is, the time you're spending on making videos is time not spent on something else you may enjoy more. With that said, I hope you all have a wonderful 2019! If you have some tips and tricks you'd like to share as well, feel free to post them here.
  6. 2 points
    Moin. Cannibalization of viewership is a concept that sounds very unintuitive the first time you stumble upon it: Why would making more content result in less views? There's usually 2 reasons to it: Your uploads are overwhelming the viewers. If you upload too many videos each day, non-fan subscribers will eventually get annoyed by you clogging up their feed. You can see this in stats on eg. the media.ccc.de YouTube mirror: Content was being created from 5 stages for 13h per day over 3 days, translated into 3 languages. The conference was featured on German prime time news and had coverage by basically every news outlet, but despite all of that the channel didn't grow during the conference itself. Only after the endless stream of video found its end, the effects of the large publicity became noticeable. Your additional content doesn't resonate with your subscriber base. For example, if you're a band rarely uploading music videos, starting a daily vlog series or livestream may be the coolest thing ever for your fans, but still will annoy people who only subscribed to the channel for the music. To avoid 1., you simply need to reduce your upload frequency. One video per day is plenty; you may even want to go below that if it allows you to produce better videos or take some time off. Don't take it too far though, uploading too rarely can lead to people not remembering why they subscribed to you in the first place. If you're coming from "multiple videos per day", anywhere from daily to weekly videos should perform better. To avoid 2., you may want to try using different websites or website features. For the music channel for example, instead of making a vlog, using stories some place where your fans can find it may be a good idea. Or you may want to start second and third channels for these kinds of content, eg. how Game Theory has a dedicated GTlive channel for livestreams. In short: Research how many and which kinds of videos your viewers would like to watch.
  7. 2 points
    Thank you for your response, but I wonder how is my current channel which is purely music and other music channel flourishing very well without being demonetised. This is something I am finding hard to understand. Are they very biased?
  8. 1 point
    My Tv show (GenderChatShow)is mine, registered by me, produced by me content and all created by me, but my monetization was held for further review, what could be wrong here? it's been too long a waiting here.
  9. 1 point
    No idea. I not the one that makes the decisions. Depends if the reviewer considers what you are doing is unique enough and adds value to the ecosystem.
  10. 1 point
    You are using way to much content of others for it to be considered fair use. You have YouTube's decision and they consider that you do not meet the criteria for monetization as you are using too much content that is not your
  11. 1 point
    Moin. YouTube's social features at the moment are as follows: The comments of a video are somewhat nice for smaller channels, but as soon as the channel reaches a size where the creator cannot react to all comments anymore, they become something somewhere between meaningless ("who is watching in 2019?") to toxic (trolls, political shouting matches, etc.) Likes and dislikes provide no meaningful feedback about the video for the creator, other than perhaps "this video has a technical issue" if the dislikes outweigh the likes mostly. (the community tab and stories exist, but I haven't really used them for anything due to me not using mobile much) To YouTube's credit, outright abuse has been reduced in the past couple years, presumably through the Perspective API, changes to the comment rankings (so that inflammatory comments don't automatically are the top comments) and changes to discussion visibility (through hiding replies to a comment). They however have not affected the meaninglessness of the comments. As a creator, there are three types of comments I really like to see: Anything showing a healthy community. Frequent commenters interacting with each other. Constructive criticism. Often, when I make a thing, friends and family will compliment me on it, even though it actually is kinda bad and I know it. Getting criticism I can improve off of (and that doesn't include a vague insult at my person) is incredibly difficult, so I'm really thankful for any comment saying something among the lines of "I found this part to be a bit too lengthy". The goal isn't necessarily to become famous, the goal is to make artistically challenging content. For me, anyways. praise and compliments. Those make me feel warm and fuzzy every time, even if they don't help me make my videos better. YouTube currently has nothing helping #2 whatsoever. Finding constructive criticism takes hours of shifting through comments, especially when trying to interact with people in category 1 and 3 on the way. Constructive criticism so far I can best find on film festivals and competitions, because there I can talk with people with the right expertise and because of the juries present, there definitely are some critical eyes on my work. Which isn't to say that I enjoy these events, due to me not really being a competitive person, and also not a terribly extravert one either. YouTube could take steps to making both comments and ratings more meaningful as something that critics could be use, that would be great. Now, I know that feature request aren't necessarily the most useful thing to any developer, but I'm going to include some anyways: Split up the meaningless from the meaningful. Leave the comment section as the chaos that it currently is and let a quick click on like or dislike allow people to save the video to their liked video playlist, or to tune the algorithm to see fewer of my content. Whether or not the numbers are public on these things, I don't particularly care about, but considering they're meaningless anyways, hiding them by default probably works just fine. With my videos being dislike bombed somewhat frequently whenever I'm the bearer of bad news ("your channel got terminated and won't be restored"), or when I have controversial opinions elsewhere, the entire like/dislike ratio thing is pretty meaningless to me anyways because people are definitely not rating the quality of the video. I personally just hide them, and actually would somewhat like to hide view counts, too (I enjoy that nobody can tell whether or not my blog is successful or not, as it ultimately doesn't matter for the quality of the content). As for the meaningful, I'd like a system somewhere between deviantart and newgrounds. Deviantart has critiques that are separate from the normal comment and favourite (aka like) system. In critiques, critics can rate the following factors on a 5-star scale, with the overall rating being the average of the factors: In addition to this, the critics are required to write 100 words before being able to publish the critique. Once published, the critique serves as its own comment thread with people being able to reply and discuss to it. Further, the audience can rate the critique as fair or unfair, with the creator's verdict on the critique being displayed underneath it. I previously used these factors to rate a 50-something video "community rewind" competition with a jury of 4 (sample of the voting sheet below) and found that they definitely do work quite well for artsy stuff, but make it difficult to rate the boringness or entertainment value of a video (which is a big part of video anyways.), so these factors would need to get reworked a bit for YouTube. Maybe Originality, Technique, Entertainment value, Impact? Newgrounds meanwhile doesn't have comments, you can only leave a review that's quite similar to store reviews: 5 stars and you get to post your opinion on the thing. No discussions, but a dedicated forum section on their website. What I like about this is that you can directly associate the verdict of a viewer with their comment, as well as this system being way more simple than what deviantart does, however, in terms of quality these reviews is on par with the standard app store reviews or, indeed, YouTube comments. These are just my two cents on it anyways. If you have something to add, write it in the, well, comments. Either here, or on the CreatorInsider video, because YouTube is currently considering how to tackle dislike bombing.
  12. 1 point
    It is what YouTube consider reused content. It is their definition that counts, not yours.
  13. 1 point
    That is not part of the Terms of Service that I see. Which makes sense since every country has its own laws and needs a custom terms page. But I talked to youtube and what I wrote in my first reply is the current enforcement strategy of the youtube policy team. And without being a lawyer, the quoted part of the ToS (at least in my opinion) don't prohibit the selling of channels. But rather for examples ISPs to charge extra to access youtube. YouTube Channel != Access to the service. And just FYI, this happens a lot with bigger channels. Just some examples: Fact., Smosh, Phillip DeFranco, Roosterteeth and many more.
  14. 1 point
    There is no section 4d in the terms of service as found here: https://www.youtube.com/t/terms Maybe we are viewing different documents or different versions of it.
  15. 1 point
    "without any bandwidth" might be difficult. Most that offer "unlimited bandwidth" have a fair use policy in place. Some options might be Hetzner, DigitalOcean or OVH
  16. 1 point
    Yours is the sort of content that they are no longer monetizing. Does not matter if you created the music. It is still audio over still pictures/images and that sort of content is just not being monetized.
  17. 1 point
    TL;DR: If you have a recording of a loud bang on-location, you can use it to make any recording sound like it was shot in the same location
  18. 1 point
    @Eyedol Pro 아이돌 프로 if you don't have commercial use rights for the kpop stuff, then yes, that would be the issue.
  19. 1 point
    Moin. Fair Use is a thing that a lot of people say a lot of stuff about because it, in theory, gives you easy, cheap and uncomplicated access to high-quality content to implement into your video. Instead of trying to find the copyright owner and then trying to get broadcasting rights for it (worldwide? forever? that's gonna cost extra), you just download the thing and claim your use to be fair. The problem is, fair use is fuzzy, only exists in that form in the USA, and informing yourself about what it is and isn't is fairly difficult as everyone on the internet has an opinion on it without having proper qualification. Neither do I for that matter, I'm not a lawyer, but I spent the past half decade dealing with annoying copyright issues. But one thing at a time. 1. Fair Use is fuzzy. The often-quoted four factors of fair use are guidelines for judges and juries, not for creators. There are no hard guidelines that you can follow, and should your case go to court, the verdict can differ greatly from judge to judge and on whether a jury is involved. Case in point: Ray William Johnson v. Jukin Media. Ray William Johnson's equals-three show (=3) was a show in which he would collect a bunch of viral videos from the web and comment on them, parody some of it and generally try to do stuff he thought was entertaining. Jukin Media, which buys exclusive rights of viral videos, didn't like that and sued him in 2014. In 2015 the verdict was in, and the judge ruled that 18/19 videos were fair use. However, the case went on and in the next instance, in 2016, a jury ruled that 40/40 videos were not fair use. It ultimately didn't matter for the case as RWJ and Jukin settled the case before the verdict was spoken, but it does show how quickly things can turn. Even if you're certain that your use is fair and a judge agrees, the next judge (and especially jury) may not agree. 2. Fair use only exists in the US in that form. In other countries, the law simply may be different. For example, in the UK, there is a "fair dealing" law, which doesn't apply to everyone equally but rather has different requirements for private use, use as criticism, use as parody, and so on. As another example, in Germany, the "Freie Benutzung" law asks whether the original "verblasst" (~pales) in the new work. In other words, a video clearly being fair use may not help you if you're getting sued in not-the-USA. This is especially likely to happen if either you or the copyright holder lives outside the US. 3. Informing yourself about fair use is difficult. Not only does the law change every so often, is fuzzy and different from country to country, it also is fairly easy to look for information on the internet and find information that seems to validate an existing belief of yours. If you believe that putting a disclaimer up in your video is going to help with anything, you'll find plenty of places telling you it is, but that won't help you in event of a strike or lawsuit. A slightly more reliable place are the court dockets which show the judge's arguments in a fairly straight-forward language (though you need to be careful as they tend to throw in normal-looking words that mean very specific things in law-speech and not their use in common language), but, as we have seen, the judge's decision seldom is final, and the original documents tend to be rather difficult to find. A better way is to get someone who knows the stuff (ie a copyright lawyer) to look over your video, as well as the footage you're trying to use fairly, and let them make a call on whether that's a stupid idea. Often, a first and rough answer will be delivered free of charge. With that in mind, here a bit of personal preference: What would I do if I wanted to incorporate some fair use footage into my video? Don't. It'll save a lot of headaches by making videos 100% on your own. If it's necessary, try getting permission from the copyright holder. Often, the copyright holder is just happy that someone is paying attention to their content and will give permission for rather small uses. This is especially true for video games; a lot of game publishers have a thing somewhere on their website saying "you can use it in videos". If the copyright holder won't give me a permission, or wants me to pay sums I can't afford, I'll ask myself as well as a lawyer how likely it is that the video is under fair use (or rather Freie Benutzung in my case). If both me and my lawyer find the video to be fair use, I'd think about whether I care enough about the video to potentially fight through several instances of courts until I'd finally reach a conclusion, with these things sometimes taking up to a decade to resolve fully. If the video is more important to me than the potential time I'd spent on 4, I'd upload it. I am aware that the above is a result of a chilling effect: Don't exercise your rights, it's annoying. I am aware that in an ideal world, you'd skip point 1, 2 and 4 and just get someone competent to defend you and fight to the bitter end, accepting no settlement. But the time you'd have to spend on permission-getting, lawyer-asking and court-fighting could be much better spent on just being creative and making a different video that is yours, 100% yours and only yours.
  20. 1 point
    Moin. If you are doing some research on how to become a YouTuber, you'll quite quickly find a lot of information that leave you standing like a deer in headlights. Which inspired this post: A quick guide with the absolute basics you need to get started. Love being creative. Just like all other arts, a YouTube carrer demands that you love creativity. If you have trouble coming up with creative ideas, you may want to approach the topic from an "Let's see if I can make something creative" angle, rather than "I want to be successful quickly" one. Just Do It. If you have an idea for a video, execute it. There's no use in having the perfect plan if you never execute it. You don't need to buy any expensive equipment if you have a smartphone to be able to execute most things. Practice makes perfect. The first video you make will suck badly. Your second video probably will be slightly better, your third one even more, and so on. This however is only true if you look actively and self-critically at your videos, try to find any flaws and work out a plan to fix them next time. If you don't, it's easy to fall into a routine where you grind away video after video, not get anywhere, and blame other people ("Big YouTubers! Society!") or things ("The Algorithm!") for your lack of success - which also won't get you anywhere. Follow laws. In the creative process, it may occur that you do something illegal, possibly unaware of the legal situation and suddenly find yourself in a situation where you have to pay hefty fines, get strikes on YouTube or face other consequences. This entire thing is a complex topic which is covered a bit more in-depth here: The following is only relevant if you are out for success Define your audience. Who do you want to reach? Are the formats you have suitable to reach your audience? Pick the best formats. If you notice that a certain format or series of yours isn't as popular as your other stuff, don't be afraid to kill it. If you have a format that performs way better than your other stuff, perhaps consider making your other formats a bit more similar to the successful one. Check the market. Is someone else basically making your formats and saturating the market? Is there still a market niche you can fill? Is there a YouTuber with a similar audience to yours that you could collaborate with? What new innovations are there in the video industry, and how can you use them? These, and basically all other questions entrepreneurs have to ask themselves, are also valid for people who have "being a full-time YouTuber" as goal. This was part 1 on the topic. Part 2 can be found below.
  21. 1 point
    We are happy to introduce the next major feature that will be available for CreatorsHub members - Clubs. Clubs are a brand new way of supporting sub-communities. Many people have requested social group functionality and Clubs are our implementation of this concept. There's a lot to digest there! Let's go over the basic functionality. Club Types Four types of club are available: Public clubs Clubs that anyone can see and participate in without joining. Open club Clubs that anyone can see and join. Closed club Clubs that anyone can see in the directory, but joining must be approved by a Club Leader or Club Moderator. Non-club-members who view the club will only see the member list - not the recent activity or content areas. Private club Clubs that do not show in public, and users must be invited by a Club Leader or Club Moderator Club Users Each club has three levels of user: Leader A leader has all of the permissions of a moderator, and can add other moderators. They can also add content areas (see below). The club owner is automatically a leader. Moderators Moderators, as the name implies, have the ability to moderate content posted within the club. As the site administrator, you can define which moderator tools can be used. You could, for example, prevent any content being deleted from clubs, but allow it to be hidden. Moderators can also remove members from a club. Users Anyone else that joins the club. For closed clubs, there's an approval process. Users can request to join and the request must be approved by a leader. Leaders get a notification when a user requests to join; the user gets a notification when their request is approved or denied. Club Content Club Leaders can add a variety of content areas to their club - forums, calendars and so on. Each content area a leader adds can have a custom title, and will appear in the club navigation. This means, for example, that you can have multiple forums within a club, and give each a different name. Club Locations Clubs have built-in support for Google Maps, allowing you to specify a physical location for your club. The Club Owner specifies the location when setting up the club, and clubs are then shown on map on the directory page: And within a club, the location is shown too:
  22. 0 points
    Hello, My Channel is under review more than one month and still monetization not enabled. I am uploading 100% my original content based on kids animation stories videos. I used Sword and Blood graphics in my some kids animation videos and i am afraid and doubt regarding community guideline violations. is that true? please help me regarding my contents this is OK for monetization or i have some violations? find attached screen shot and here is below channel url. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSSNqt99WAo6oEfi3Tv-K_A
  23. 0 points
    Give it some time. This can take a while.
  24. 0 points
    They told you why: " we concluded that we don't have enough information to make a decision on your application at this time " I think you will find that you will be rejected. All the content I can see is just a screen recording of gameplay with no added value. They are no longer monetizing such content. In case you want to argue, you should read the guidelines first: "Video game content may be monetized if the associated step-by-step commentary is strictly tied to the live action being shown and provides instructional or educational value." "Videos simply showing a user playing a video game or the use of software for extended periods of time may not be accepted for monetization." https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/138161?hl=en
  25. 0 points
    What makes you think you are doing something wrong? Your screenshot says you are under review for monetization.
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