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Richard Aspden

Youtube Creator Community posting access finally removed.

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Hey everyone.  

 

It looks like Youtube has finally removed posting access from the Youtube Creator Community.  It looks like the final message to the English community was this message about VAT accounting. 

The community is still there, until the end of February, to save posts and contact other creators.  It seems like you can still DM other people.

Once March rolls around, it'll be a sad day.

 

Richard

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@Richard Aspden I'm actually not as angry as I was before, probably because this forum exists to continue to put down my mental notes and lessons I've learned. I think my anger arose from the obvious frustration with ad revenue generations, change in a lot of how Youtube has done some recent updates, lack of Youtube communication from their teams along side removing something that wasn't a massive loss leader.

Youtube/Google (Alphabet) no doubt has a lot more losing going on with some of their other initiatives and investments in smaller startup companies...and they continue to put money into it. To me, it seems like they had one of two decisions (one we all make at some point in our lives), "It's time to get serious and put in the effort, or it's time to cut it and move on." They obviously chose the later.

It seemed more obvious as community managers became more distant and pretty much ignored the TC's and the community (and "community" is in their name). I don't blame any of them for this behavior as I'm sure corporate re-tasked them into many directions months ago and deemphasized the time they were putting into it. It almost seemed liked Ashley was sorta the 'signal' that things were going downhill when she decided to move on. She was usually the one to go to bat for us, she answered her google chat messages on a regular basis and always worked to try to get things done.

Ah well, in many aspects a community lead by the community is probably going to have the right level of passion and direction. I still think it's a huge miss by Youtube; it always brings me back to Microsoft and their 1990's mantra of developers, developers, developers (it was a silly meme but it's true all the same). The emphasis to get developers on the platform turned people away from Apple and onto Microsoft as a platform. Today's creators are yesterdays developers. 

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I'm connected to Danilo and Selvi on LinkedIn, and it looks like the shutdown may have been in the works for a while.  

 

I hope, now that we have this place, we can continue building on what we know.

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Yeah, as a community manager in my daily work (for my company's online communities), I know that it's ridiculously time-consuming and resource-intensive to keep a good community going. I think that YouTube fell into the same trap I see many communities falling into, which is to believe that their communities will be "self-sustaining," in that the membership would take the wheel in terms of content creation, focus, and deciding on the themes that are emerging with the community-at-large and how to handle them. It's not something that I think they anticipated (though you'd think they might have some insight into it) and the fact that they leaned so heavily on the TCs and RSs for most of the moderation work was telling.

That said, I think it's better to have it closed than to have an open community where the spamming was getting so overwhelming, the questions that the TCs couldn't answer from a company perspective were just hanging there without any response, and people taking guesses about what YouTube had in mind with policies, etc. It's sad, but not surprising.

1 minute ago, Richard Aspden said:

I'm connected to Danilo and Selvi on LinkedIn, and it looks like the shutdown may have been in the works for a while.  

 

I hope, now that we have this place, we can continue building on what we know.

When they didn't hire anyone to replace Ashley, I kind of figured they were either focusing on non-English forums or that they just gave up on the Community altogether.

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I have to agree with @Derrick Schommer about Ashley moving on when she did. I don't think it was to be near family and friends like she stated.  It seemed like the US based TC & RS were left out in the cold after she left.  Then that new design of the forum was a flop. Not setting up the proper links to the community. They just let it go.

It seems like they're making bad decisions in every department, and one department isn't communicating with the others.They're all going in different directions with blinders on.

Maybe it's time to go back to Vimeo! LOL

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@Tom Kvichak No, vimeo isn't going to save you :-) I think it's more primitive than that... Youtube, from a high level, is a non-scalable solution that shouldn't work. But, it does because Google has smart folks and great AI and automation to make it more scalable. With 300 hours of video uploaded a minute (and that's old information) it has to be unbelievable to try to manage that data. Especially when you're then trying to put advertising against it.

I'm not sympathetic to the problem, but that doesn't mean I have to like some of the situations. Hard problems are hard for a reason and Youtube is breaking into territory never done before by humans. They have no past to reference for successful execution.

However, that doesn't excuse lack of communication. I think that's a management problem that starts at the top and works its way down. A business takes on the personality of those running the organization. I'd not be surprised to find out the CM's don't know much more about what's going on than we do in the end. That communication issue is more than just the creators.

All technical barriers are encountered by every business trying to tackle the problem and Youtube is probably going to solve most of those before anyone else (unless the core team leaves and starts up their own media project, but good luck finding a funder!) The only reason some of those smaller video services feel more free and flexible is because they don't have the scale problem to solve!

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